Furniture & Politics

Went to look at furniture the other day. Thought it might be fun to invest in a pretty table that we could take back to the States. Saw some amazing hand-crafted pieces, very creatively designed and beautifully rendered. The saleslady mentioned that one I was admiring used wood made from Russia. Rather than seeing it as a selling point, I immediately became cognizant that anything I bought in the store might have some political implication, an environmental impact or infringement on human rights.

I asked about the table that I liked the most. Where did that wood come from?

Myanmar.

I became familiar with Myanmar last year when I did a play that featured a biographical sketch on Aun Sung Suu Kyi, the courageous, self-sacrificing pro-democracy activist and nobel prize winner that has been under house arrest and intense personal suppression for her powerful yet peaceful opposition to the brutal military junta. The government did not recognize her victory in elections and murdered thousands of her unarmed supporters.

Then, right after my furniture shopping, news came out of Myanmar about the monks that were demonstrating against the government, triggered by a sudden 500% price hike on fuel. The story figures prominently in the news here, and it has gripped me as the number of protesters has swelled to tens of thousands. The monks hold rice bowls upside-down over their heads, symbolizing excommunication of the would-be benefactors in a government that reveres but represses them. The riot police are coming out, and observers are marveling that brutal action hasn’t been taken yet.

The news people now say that China must be exerting its influence on the country with no other "friends" in the world. China’s no beacon of democracy, but the Olympics are driving this country to put their best face before the world. We’ll see in the next couple of days what will happen.

Meanwhile, I’ll pray for the monks. I’ll not buy any of those tables. I’ll think about where my furniture comes from. While this may cause delay, inconvenience and extra expense, I have to heed Aung San’s example. She said "To live the full live, one must have the courage to bear the responsibility of the needs of others. One must want to bear this responsibility."

Where am I going to buy a table? I’m in China, for God’s sake. But it’s not like I’m putting my life on the line marching for freedom.

Tina

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